What foods help repair kidneys?


 Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

It's critical to keep track of everything you eat and drink if you have chronic kidney disease (CKD). This is due to your kidneys' inability to clear waste materials from your body as efficiently as they could. A kidney-friendly diet can help you live longer and healthier.

What Does It Mean to Eat a Kidney-Friendly Diet?

The kidneys' main job is to eliminate waste and excess fluid from your body through pee. They also include:

  • Maintain a healthy fluid balance in your body.
  • Minerals such as salt and potassium should be in balance in your body.
  • Produce hormones that have an impact on the functioning of other organs.

A kidney-friendly diet is a method of eating that aids in the prevention of additional kidney damage. Some meals and drinks will have to be limited so that other fluids and minerals, such as electrolytes, do not build up in your body. Simultaneously, you must ensure that you acquire the proper balance of protein, calories, vitamins, and minerals.

If you have CKD in its early stages, you may have few, if any, dietary restrictions. However, as your sickness progresses, you'll need to be more cautious about the foods you consume.

The doctor may advise you to work with a dietitian to select kidney-friendly foods. They might suggest:

Reduce your sodium intake.

This mineral can be found in a variety of foods. Table salt is the most prevalent source.

Blood pressure is affected by sodium. It also aids in the maintenance of your body's water balance. Kidneys that are in good shape keep salt levels in check. However, if you have CKD, your body accumulates extra sodium and water. Swollen ankles, elevated blood pressure, shortness of breath, and fluid buildup around your heart and lungs are all symptoms of this. In your daily diet, you should strive for fewer than 2 grams of sodium.

To reduce sodium in your diet, follow these simple steps:

  • Table salt and high-sodium spices should be avoided (soy sauce, sea salt, garlic salt, etc.).
  • Cook at home because most fast food has a lot of sodium.
  • Instead of salt, experiment with various spices and herbs.
  • If at all possible, avoid packaged foods. They have a high salt content.
  • When shopping, read the labels, and choose low-sodium goods.
  • Before serving, rinse canned items (vegetables, beans, meats, and fish) with water

Calcium and phosphorus should be minimized

These minerals are required to keep your bones healthy and strong. When your kidneys are in good shape, they filter out the phosphorus you don't require. However, phosphorus levels can get excessively high if you have CKD. You're at risk for heart disease as a result of this. Furthermore, your calcium levels start to fall. Your body compensates by pulling it from your bones. This can make them frail and more easily broken.

If you have late-stage CKD, your doctor may recommend that you consume no more than 1,000 mg of phosphorus each day. This can be accomplished by:

  • Choosing foods that are low in phosphorus (search for the word "PHOS" on the label)
  • Increasing your intake of fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Choosing grains made of corn and rice
  • consuming light-colored carbonated beverages
  • Meat, poultry and fish consumption are being reduced.
  • Keeping dairy to a minimum
  • Calcium-rich foods also contain a high amount of phosphorus. 

The doctor may advise you to limit your calcium-rich foods.

The following dairy foods are low in phosphorus:

  • Swiss or brie cheese
  • Sour cream or regular or low-fat cream cheese
  • Sherbet

The doctor may also advise you to stop taking calcium supplements over-the-counter and prescribe a phosphorus binder, which is a medication that regulates your phosphorus levels.

Lower you’re Potassium Consumption.

This mineral aids in the normal functioning of your neurons and muscles. However, if you have CKD, your body is unable to filter out excess potassium. It can cause major heart problems if you have too much of it in your blood.

Potassium is found in bananas, potatoes, avocados, oranges, cooked broccoli, raw carrots, greens (excluding kale), tomatoes, and melons, among other fruits and vegetables. Potassium levels in the blood can be affected by these foods. If you need to limit this mineral in your diet, your doctor will let you know. If this is the case, they may advise you to eat low-potassium recommend that you eat low-potassium meals such as:

  • Apple juice with apples
  • Cranberries and cranberry juice are two types of cranberries.
  • As your CKD progresses, you may need to make more dietary modifications.

This could include reducing your intake of high-protein meals, particularly animal protein. Meats, seafood, and dairy products are among them. You may also require additional iron.

When you have CKD, talk to your doctor about which iron-rich foods you can eat such as:

  • Strawberries, blueberries and raspberries are some of the most popular berries.
  • Plums
  • Pineapples
  • Peaches
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower, boiled
  • Asparagus
  • Beans are a legume (green or wax)
  • Celery
  • Cucumberium

As your CKD progresses, you may need to make more dietary modifications. This could include reducing your intake of high-protein meals, particularly animal protein. Meats, seafood and dairy products are among them. You may also require additional iron. When you have CKD, talk to your doctor about which iron-rich foods you can eat.




Renal Diet Cookbook For Beginners: Renal Diet Cookbook (4-Weeks Meal Plan) with Low Sodium and Potassium to help Manage Kidney Disease and Prevent Dialysis.

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